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mediumaevum:

  • Old

Hwæt. We Gardena in geardagum,
þeodcyninga, þrym gefrunon,
hu ða æþelingas ellen fremedon.

  • Middle

Ye seken lond and see for your wynnynges,
As wise folk ye knowen all th’estaat
Of regnes; ye been fadres of tydynges
And tales, bothe of pees and of debaat.

  • Early Modern (early phase)

So whan the duke and his wyf were comyn unto the Kynge, by the meanes of grete lordes they were accorded bothe. The kynge lyked and loved this lady wel, and he made them grete chere oute of mesure – and desyred to have lyen by her. But she was a passyng good woman and wold not assente unto the Kyng.

Quote
"The Greek word for return is nostos. Algos means suffering. So nostalgia is the suffering caused by an unappeased yearning to return."

Kundera, Milan. Ignorance.  (via literarymiscellany)

(Source: wordsnquotes, via curare)

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mediumaevum:

Tawdry means “cheap and gaudy in appearance.” Its story begins with a 7th-century queen Æthelthryth who renounced her royal life and became a saintly abbess.
Suffering from a fatal condition that included a swelling in her throat, the dying abbess attributed that symptom to God’s punishment for her onetime fondness for necklaces.
After her death, the abbess became Saint Audrey, and her shrine became a popular site for English pilgrims. At an annual fair in her honor, all sorts of cheap knickknacks and jewelry were sold, including a type of necklace called Saint Audrey’s lace.
By the 17th century, St. Audrey’s lace had become tawdry lace. Tawdry came to be applied to other cheap goods sold at these fairs – and from there to other tastelessly showy things.
image: Saint Etheldreda’s statue in Ely Cathedral

mediumaevum:

Tawdry means “cheap and gaudy in appearance.” Its story begins with a 7th-century queen Æthelthryth who renounced her royal life and became a saintly abbess.

Suffering from a fatal condition that included a swelling in her throat, the dying abbess attributed that symptom to God’s punishment for her onetime fondness for necklaces.

After her death, the abbess became Saint Audrey, and her shrine became a popular site for English pilgrims. At an annual fair in her honor, all sorts of cheap knickknacks and jewelry were sold, including a type of necklace called Saint Audrey’s lace.

By the 17th century, St. Audrey’s lace had become tawdry lace. Tawdry came to be applied to other cheap goods sold at these fairs – and from there to other tastelessly showy things.

image: Saint Etheldreda’s statue in Ely Cathedral

(Source: merriam-webster.com)

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mediumaevum:

When angry taxpayers liken the Internal Revenue Service to “vultures,” they’re actually making a deep linguistic connection.
During the Middle Ages, English officials would charge a tax on non-resident merchants who sold goods on the streets. This duty was known as a scavage (after a Middle French word meaning “to inspect”); the tax-collectors were scavagers.
Over time, those scavagers expanded their duties to cleaning the streets of dirt and debris. Scavager became scavenger.
image: Marinus Van Reymerswaele, The Tax Collectors, c. 1540s

mediumaevum:

When angry taxpayers liken the Internal Revenue Service to “vultures,” they’re actually making a deep linguistic connection.

During the Middle Ages, English officials would charge a tax on non-resident merchants who sold goods on the streets. This duty was known as a scavage (after a Middle French word meaning “to inspect”); the tax-collectors were scavagers.

Over time, those scavagers expanded their duties to cleaning the streets of dirt and debris. Scavager became scavenger.

image: Marinus Van Reymerswaele, The Tax Collectors, c. 1540s

(Source: merriam-webster.com)

Tags: linguistics
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acquaintedwithrask:

strampunkgear:

foreverdisneynerd:

For Atlantis, Disney needed a new language for the Atlantean people. To do this, Disney hired Mark Okrand, the man who also created the famous Klingon and Vulcan for the Star Trek series. In the Atlantean language, Mark Okrand’s main source for it’s roots and stems of its words are Proto-Indo-European,but as Okrand also described it as being the “tower of babel” or “root dialect” for all languages in the world, he also used ancient Chinese, Latin, Greek, Biblical Hebrew, along with many other ancient languages or their reconstructions. As such, you can actually learn to write and speak the language!

This film is so underrated it hurts.

ah this explains how they understood french and english so well almost instantly… better than the magical wind in Pocahontas that’s for sure

acquaintedwithrask:

strampunkgear:

foreverdisneynerd:

For Atlantis, Disney needed a new language for the Atlantean people. To do this, Disney hired Mark Okrand, the man who also created the famous Klingon and Vulcan for the Star Trek series. In the Atlantean language, Mark Okrand’s main source for it’s roots and stems of its words are Proto-Indo-European,but as Okrand also described it as being the “tower of babel” or “root dialect” for all languages in the world, he also used ancient Chinese, Latin, Greek, Biblical Hebrew, along with many other ancient languages or their reconstructions. As such, you can actually learn to write and speak the language!

This film is so underrated it hurts.

ah this explains how they understood french and english so well almost instantly… better than the magical wind in Pocahontas that’s for sure

(via tyvianred)

Link

themeaningofsweetpea:

I think it’s important that people know that when you say “oh that black girl speaks like a white girl” or whatever that it’s extremely rude and that “white” speak isn’t the only formal vernacular and that the way of speaking people often associate with “ghetto talk” is actually called Black…

Photoset
Photoset

amuseoffyre:

midnightyen:

THIS JUST BLOWS MY MIND.

People seem to forget that she studied languages and the classics at uni.

(via angrydumpling)

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fursasaida:

infamousnfamous:

axonsandsynapses:

yuletidekarkat:

dannygayhealani:

creatingaquietmind:

the speech impediment of the 21st century (by Marc Johns)

I’ll fuck you up buddy this is not a speech impediment it’s linguistic evolution!! the existence of the phrase “Aisha was like” allows the speaker to convey whatever Aisha said without making the listener assume they’re quoting Aisha directly while still maintaining the FEELING of what Aisha said.
ie, Aisha said she didn’t want to go out with me VERSUS Aisha was like, “I’d rather kiss a Wookie”.
the addition of “XYZ was like” lets the speaker be more expressive and efficient and it is a totally valid method of communicating information!!

With the way language has evolved, this is one of the few ways I can even think of to express in casual conversation what someone said. 
"So I said to Aisha," is certainly used, but if you remove the "so," which implies casual tone ("and" can be used in the same way), you get
"I said to Aisha," which is really formal in most English dialects/variations. I don’t know about all, but in New England dialects, you sound like you’re reading aloud from a novel.
"I told Aisha," is really only used when you continue to describe, not tell, what you told her. Ex: "I told Aisha that James was too punk for her" works while, "I told Aisha, ‘James is too punk for you’" crosses the line back into formalness of the "I said."
Things like “I asked” or “I answered [with]” are similar levels of casual and efficient to the “So, I said [or say, as many conversations about the past take place in present tense anyway, as if the speaker is giving a play-by-play in the moment]” but are specific to only certain situations. 
"I was like, 'Marc Johns, what is your obsession with restoring archaic speech patterns and interfering with the natural progression of English from complex to efficient?'" envelopes all of these easily and is accessible and crisp, and allows for more variations on inflection than the others.
Of course, James is probably like, “I already fucking said that.” But eh, I tried adding on.

#linguistics #a.k.a. how I learned to stop worrying and love the evolution of the English language without being a discriminatory elitist jerk (via crystalandrock)

also the OP is hella insulting to people that actually have a speech impediment

Not only does it allow you to approximate speech without perfect recall, it also allows you to report non-verbal reactions! Like, I can tell a story and say “So he said—he actually said—'Baby, I'd take money from the mob for you!’ and I was like, [insert horrified face and scooby-doo noise].”
So here, using “said” instead of “was like” emphasizes that I am passing on a real, ridiculous thing (PS this literally has been said to me by a random dude on the street), I am not exaggerating for comic effect; and the “was like” keeps me from having to say “And I was horrified, as you might well imagine, and found myself speechless.” Like, I’m not speaking stage directions, I am telling a damn story. Stopping to pick verbs like stated, repeated, asked, replied—or having to use ten to fifteen words to describe an action or reaction—is much less natural and communicative in person, even though it can be essential to writing.
WRITTEN LANGUAGE =/= SPOKEN LANGUAGE. WHY IS THIS SO HARD FOR PEOPLE TO GRASP.

fursasaida:

infamousnfamous:

axonsandsynapses:

yuletidekarkat:

dannygayhealani:

creatingaquietmind:

the speech impediment of the 21st century (by Marc Johns)

I’ll fuck you up buddy this is not a speech impediment it’s linguistic evolution!! the existence of the phrase “Aisha was like” allows the speaker to convey whatever Aisha said without making the listener assume they’re quoting Aisha directly while still maintaining the FEELING of what Aisha said.

ie, Aisha said she didn’t want to go out with me VERSUS Aisha was like, “I’d rather kiss a Wookie”.

the addition of “XYZ was like” lets the speaker be more expressive and efficient and it is a totally valid method of communicating information!!

With the way language has evolved, this is one of the few ways I can even think of to express in casual conversation what someone said. 

"So I said to Aisha," is certainly used, but if you remove the "so," which implies casual tone ("and" can be used in the same way), you get

"I said to Aisha," which is really formal in most English dialects/variations. I don’t know about all, but in New England dialects, you sound like you’re reading aloud from a novel.

"I told Aisha," is really only used when you continue to describe, not tell, what you told her. Ex: "I told Aisha that James was too punk for her" works while, "I told Aisha, ‘James is too punk for you’" crosses the line back into formalness of the "I said."

Things like “I asked” or “I answered [with]” are similar levels of casual and efficient to the “So, I said [or say, as many conversations about the past take place in present tense anyway, as if the speaker is giving a play-by-play in the moment]” but are specific to only certain situations. 

"I was like, 'Marc Johns, what is your obsession with restoring archaic speech patterns and interfering with the natural progression of English from complex to efficient?'" envelopes all of these easily and is accessible and crisp, and allows for more variations on inflection than the others.

Of course, James is probably like, “I already fucking said that.” But eh, I tried adding on.

  (via crystalandrock)

also the OP is hella insulting to people that actually have a speech impediment

Not only does it allow you to approximate speech without perfect recall, it also allows you to report non-verbal reactions! Like, I can tell a story and say “So he said—he actually said—'Baby, I'd take money from the mob for you!’ and I was like, [insert horrified face and scooby-doo noise].”

So here, using “said” instead of “was like” emphasizes that I am passing on a real, ridiculous thing (PS this literally has been said to me by a random dude on the street), I am not exaggerating for comic effect; and the “was like” keeps me from having to say “And I was horrified, as you might well imagine, and found myself speechless.” Like, I’m not speaking stage directions, I am telling a damn story. Stopping to pick verbs like stated, repeated, asked, replied—or having to use ten to fifteen words to describe an action or reaction—is much less natural and communicative in person, even though it can be essential to writing.

WRITTEN LANGUAGE =/= SPOKEN LANGUAGE. WHY IS THIS SO HARD FOR PEOPLE TO GRASP.

(via fireblooms)